November 11, 2013

elsewhere: "Amazon to Offer Sunday Delivery Via the U.S. Post Office"

Us-post-office
"Eliminating one more barrier to online purchasing, Amazon will begin offering Sunday delivery in New York and Los Angeles this month via the U.S. Post Office.

The program, which starts Nov. 17 in those two cities, will be available to Amazon Prime members at no additional costs. Amazon plans to expand the program next year into Dallas, New Orleans, Phoenix and other cities.

'As online shopping continues to increase, the Postal Service is very happy to offer shippers like Amazon the option of having packages delivered on Sunday,' said Patrick R. Donahoe, Postmaster General and CEO, in a press release. 'With this new service, the Postal Service is now delivering packages seven days a week in select cities. Customers can expect the same reliable and valued service that the Postal Service currently provides.'” Read more...
via Mashable

There's a few reasons why I think this news about Amazon.com and the USPS is intriguing:
  • Sunday as a "holy" day: It used to be that when folks asked what day of the week made sense to start a new faith community expression, my typical response was Sunday. Why? Because while an increasing number of people did not attend church, it still remained a "holy" day of sorts. That is to say, Sunday was still different than weekdays and different than Saturday. Increasingly, this isn't the case. Rather, I wonder if smaller groups of people in similar industries or offices have the a common "day of rest" and if churches are interested in making that day "holy" for folks, it'll be more subcultural specific, more context specific and a lot more "smaller" expressions rather than one big expression.
  • From Christian culture to Consumer culture: It was Christendom's influence on our culture that established Sunday as the day on which nothing but churches, as public institutions, had their doors open. I'm wondering what it says about our culture when consumer practices become an increasingly dominant characteristic. At the same time, ought there be a prophetic, Christian critique of consumerism? I've shared my thoughts about consumerism being our greatest challenge in western culture before.
James K.A. Smith's work on the subject, particularly in his book Desiring the Kingdom, offers some great insights into this subject.

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