Decent Guacamole Will Have To Do

Rocket from the Crypt had a a reunion show in DC some months ago. RFTC is a legendary band from San Diego–not as amazing as singer/guitarist, John Reis's other band, Drive Like Jehu but this is besides the point. I was lucky enough to be at the show. In between songs, Reis conducted the typical stage banter of bands. But Reis's banter stuck with me:

He talked about the canyons in the city of San Diego.

He talked about the coyotes that roam those canyons eating the cats belonging to San Diego urbanites.

He made fun of Chipotle and spoke of the glories of taco shops in southern California.

To most in the room he must have sounded like a lunatic. To me, it was fantastic! I got his jokes. I knew what all the San Diego references were about. The sense of nostalgia for my hometown was a great feeling! But I have to imagine that for most of the others in the room it sounded like gibberish.

I think church can often be the same. The way we talk about things makes all the sense in the world to us. We're insiders. We like the familiarity, the memories it brings back. But to everyone else around us it sounds strange, outlandish.

Some of that strangeness is simply part of being a counter cultural community. But some of it is simply being unaware of our surroundings, the context we do our work in. Or assuming that others ought to acquiesce to our worldview.

Different is okay, we ought to be inviting people into another way of being human, another reality.

Incomprehensible, unable to relate to is not okay.

San Diego's canyons only make sense to Washingtonians if you compare them to Rock Creek Park.

San Diego's coyotes in the city only make sense if you contrast them with the deer running through DC.

You can't find really good Mexican food in DC. But Chipotle's got decent guacamole. Decent guacamole will have to do ... until the next time you're on the west coast, at least.